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"Zany...Madcap...Raucous...Mischevious..."

Maria Russo, New York Times

The American Gargoyles have one mission: to save their home. The once-celebrated but now-forgotten Wentworth Building is targeted for destruction by an egomaniacal developer who wants to knock it down to build a giant mirror so he can look at himself all day.

Working together, the sooty statues go from being ignored stone carvings to brave and brainy heroes cheered by the entire city.

 

“Oh My Gosh! How freaking cute is AMERICAN GARGOYLES! If you have kids and are interested in preservation this is a must buy!” 

– Larissa Munsch @OLDHOUSELOVE 

"This Indie book from a co-writer of the cult comedy film "Chief Zabu" tells the zany tale of a historic Manhattan building slated for destruction by an egomaniac developer Mr. Hairdoux. The building's gargoyles hatch a madcap plan to save their home, uniting the city. It's a raucous call-out to a vision of New York City that is, alas, fading fast, but clearly still has some mischievous life in it."

- Maria Russo, New York Times

“I recently had the joy of reading AMERICAN GARGOYLES, a wonderful kids’ book about some spunky gargoyles who set out to save a historic building from being demolished. The colors are happy, the characters are adorable, and the book feels absolutely sincere. Plus, what historian doesn’t love the idea of teaching kids to love old buildings? I was totally charmed.”

– Carolyn Purnell, INVENTING COLOR

American Gargoyles reviewed by a 9 and 11 year old:

From (my kids')responses, it would appear that this book will prove the sleeper children’s book hit of the summer!

Michelle (11): "You can never get tired of reading AMERICAN GARGOYLES!"

Julian(9 ):“Can I be in charge of merchandise?”

Read the complete review here

“AMERICAN GARGOYLES is a friendly pop-fizz confection, long on hip, happy atmosphere, a sweet “urban legend” for city dwellers who know what is lost each time a classic building is replaced by a modern edifice long on ego  and short on genuine style.”

James Kenney, WHAT’CHA READING?

Read the complete what'cha reading? review here